Photograph of smiling Young Writers' Camp students in matching t-shirts

Young Writers' Camp

A letter from Mitch Cox, Duke Young Writers’ Camp Academic Director:

Dear Young Writers and Their Parents and Teachers,

Welcome to Duke Young Writers’ Camp, Summer 2016. If you’re new to Duke Young Writers’ Camp or Duke Youth Programs, you’ll want to read on about what our program has to offer middle school- and high school-aged campers. If you’re familiar with the camp, you may want to view the Classes section on this page to see our tentative offerings and course descriptions. In either case, Duke University Continuing Education Youth Programs Director Thomas Patterson and I have prepared an exciting curriculum.

Why do young people choose Young Writers’ Camp? Here are some reasons noted by past campers:

  • It’s not like school: Imagine a place where learning and fun are the same.
  • It’s a stress-free, nonjudgmental, open environment.
  • It gives campers freedom to write on topics and genres that interest campers.
  • It teaches “the rules” for writing, but also ways to break those rules.
  • Even its academic classes allow students to be creative.
  • It’s full of writing exercises that tease the mind and bond you with fellow campers.
  • It’s a place to find and make friends; it’s a place to find people like you.

Why should parents select this camp or teachers recommend it?

  • While campers use the term “fun,” we prefer the term “engaging.” Camp engages its participants intellectually, emotionally, physically:
    • A casual observer dropping into one of our classes might see young people acting out the lives and situations of student-generated characters, rapping and performing poetry and song, walking down Ninth Street in Durham and “listening in on” and recording conversations to develop an ear for dialogue, participating in a round-table discussion of their classmates’ work, taste-testing desserts as a review of the fare at the Mad Hatter Bakeshop and Café.
    • Field trips to local businesses, art museums, gardens, and dance festivals are a regular feature of our classes.
    • While campers are given class time for quiet writing, they also draft, revise, and edit collaboratively.
    • After an academic day of writing classes, many of our extended day and residential campers choose physical afternoon activities such as sports and drama.
  • While they are having “fun,”
    • Campers learn the basics of composition:
      • Show, don't tell. Show, don't tell. Show, don't tell. Whether you're writing a narrative, informational, or argumentative essay (Common Core English Lang. Arts Standards Alert!), this is the one rule everyone needs to know.
      • Write about what you know: even if one writes fantasy, one always draws on personal experience.
    • Campers learn to initiate, plan, develop, organize, and revise and edit their writing.
    • But do campers learn “grammar” parents ask?
      • While grammar is not the primary focus of our camp or classes, we do recognize the importance of editing one’s writing for errors.
      • In fact, as part of instruction, our teachers offer campers various editing tips.
      • However, the core “rules” of writing involve finding and developing a writer’s focus, purpose, and individual voice; learning techniques for developing and organizing one’s work; gaining a sense of the structure of various genres of composition; and fostering an awareness of audience.
      • Once campers come to see themselves as writers, then the mechanics and grammar have a context, begin to matter and make sense from within.
    • Many campers become more comfortable with public speaking.
      • We begin each morning with a writing activity in which the whole camp participates and at the end of which, 10 to 15 volunteers have the opportunity to share their writing orally.
      • During classes, instructors regularly invite campers to share their works-in-progress orally with classmates.
      • Every academic day ends with a time called Readers' Forum, where 15 to 20 volunteers share from their self-composed texts.
      • During the second week, a group of 15 to 20 campers are selected by their instructors to read from original works at the Regulator Bookshop on 9th Street in Durham, NC.
      • On the last night of camp, 35 to 45 campers volunteer to share their writing in a Readers' Theatre called Final Celebration.
      • While no camper is ever forced to read in front of other campers, instructors strive to create a nurturing environment that encourages campers to share work.

Our instructors are professional teachers who write and professional writers who teach.

Because our class sizes are small, our instructors are able to give concrete, specific oral and written feedback as to what campers are doing well and on what they need to work.

As I said previously, past campers noted how unlike school, camp was, not because they weren't learning about writing, about how to write, about how to write better. Rather, the whole experience of camp goes toward helping students see themselves as writers and as a community of writers. Campers learn from each other as well as their instructors and professional writers how to craft real writing for authentic purposes and audiences. In this way, campers make the rules of writing a part of themselves. Such internalization and such community building do not usually occur in schools. Young people leave our camp, seeing it as a second home, a place and people acknowledging each camper’s creativity and individuality.

I encourage you to examine the Classes section on this page for a full course list. Each session offers fiction and poetry writing classes as well as college admissions essay and journalism courses. Whether campers are taking Paper Cuts: Words that Wound and Win (an argumentative essay writing class) or Fan Fiction (where they write narratives about their favorite comic book character), they are engaged in developing skills identified in the Common Core State Initiative of English Language Arts Standards; but more important, they are on their way to becoming lifetime writers.

I cannot wait for the summer and the prospect of meeting and working with young writers and their parents. Until then, have a wonderful start of this new year.

Sincerely,

Mitch Cox, Duke Young Writers’ Camp Academic Director

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Schedule

Important Dates for Session I

Sunday, June 19, 2016

  • 2:00 - 4:00 pm -- Check-in for Residential Students a the Blackwell Residence Hall
  • 5:15 pm -- Living Group Meeting
  • 6:00 pm -- Dinner
  • 7:00 pm -- Orientation & Evening Activities

Monday, June 20, 2016

  • First day of classes
  • 9:00 am -- 9:30 Day and Extended Day Students check in at the White Lecture Hall

Thursday, June 30, 2016

  • Final Day of Class
  • 7:30 pm -- Final Celebration (Readings & Reception) at White Lecture Hall. Parents are encouraged to attend!

Friday, July 1, 2016

  • Check out for Residential Students.
  • Must depart by noon.

Important Dates for Session II

Sunday, July 10, 2016

  • 2:00 - 4:00 pm -- Check-in for Residential Students at Blackwell Residence Hall
  • 5:15 pm -- Living Group Meeting
  • 6:00 pm -- Dinner
  • 7:00 pm -- Orientation & Evening Activities

Monday, July 11, 2016

  • First day of classes
  • 9:00 - 9:30 -- Day and Extended Day Students check in at White Lecture Hall

Thursday, July 21, 2016

  • Final day of classes
  • 7:30 pm -- Final Celebration (Readings & Reception) at White Lecture Hall. Parents are encouraged to attend!

Friday, July 22, 2016

  • Check-out for Residential Students.
  • Must depart by noon.

Important Dates for Session III

Sunday, July 24, 2016

  • 2:00 - 4:00 pm -- Check-in for Residential Students at Blackwell Residence Hall
  • 5:15 pm -- Living Group Meeting
  • 6:00 pm -- Dinner
  • 7:00 pm -- Orientation & Evening Activities

Monday, July 25, 2016

  • First day of classes
  • 9:00 - 9:30 -- Day and Extended Day Students check in at White Lecture Hall

Thursday, August 4, 2016

  • Final day of classes
  • 7:30 pm -- Final Celebration (Readings & Reception) at White Lecture Hall. Parents are encouraged to attend!

Friday, August 5, 2016

  • Check-out for Residential Students.
  • Must depart by noon.

Day Camper Schedule (all sessions)

9:30 am Day Campers arrive at White Lecture Hall on East Campus
10:00 am Morning gathering
10:30 am Free-writing
11:00 am Morning Class
12:45 pm Lunch in the East Campus Marketplace
2:00 pm Free-writing
2:30 pm Afternoon class
4:00 pm Readers' forum
4:30 pm Day camper pick-up from White Lecture Hall on East Campus

 

Extended Day Camper Schedule (all sessions)

9:30 am Extended Day Campers arrive at White Lecture Hall on East Campus
10:00 am Morning gathering
10:30 am Free-writing
11:00 am Morning class
12:45 pm Lunch in the East Campus Marketplace
2:00 pm Free-writing
2:30 pm Afternoon class
4:00 pm Readers' forum
4:30 pm Extended Day Camper to Blackwell Residence Hall
5:00 pm Afternoon activities for residential and extended day students
6:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm Evening activities
9:00 pm Extended day students depart from Blackwell Residence Hall

 

Residential Camper Schedule (all sessions)

9:00 am Breakfast - Residential Campers
10:00 am Morning gathering
10:30 am Free-writing
11:00 am Morning class
12:45 pm Lunch in the East Campus Marketplace
2:00 pm Free-writing
2:30 pm Afternoon class
4:00 pm Readers' forum
4:30 pm Extended Day Campers to Blackwell Residence Hall
5:00 pm Afternoon activities for residential & extended day students
6:00 pm Dinner
7:00 pm Evening activities
9:30 pm Residential Campers in the Residence Hall
10:00 pm Living group meetings, free time
10:30 pm Middle School students in room, lights out, door locked
11:30 pm High School students in room, door locked
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Classes

2016 Instructors and Classes by Session

Session 1 Morning Middle School Classes

Instructor: Mark Alford    Course: Action Adventure: Ready, Set, Go!
You and your hero will join Max Phoenix in sword fights, booby traps, chase scenes, secret spy stuff, and more while you complete your quest for the ever-valuable MacGuffin.  There will be victories.  There will be sweat.  There will be death.  Action and adventure, while a genre all to itself, appears in almost every other genre from romance to sci fi.  So, learn how to pace the writing, set the scene, and to put as much drama and suspense into your work as you can.  Warning: ninjas, zombie pirates, and villains bent on world domination are constant interferences in this class (not to mention robot sharks with laser beams).  Not for the timid!    

Instructor: Kevin Dublin    Course: Outer Poetry: Words Dance
Writing and sharing poetry is an act of performance. Our words sing and our words dance. The goal in this class is to write poems that perform beautifully; each day we will learn new techniques to help our words do exactly that. We’ll learn them from published and performed poems, from trips around Durham, and from each other’s work. We will collaborate with the world and then share our art. 

Instructor: Ting Lam    Course: Weird Fiction: Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark
Are you afraid of the dark? Or maybe you’ve conquered that fear with a love of reading, writing, and telling scary stories around a campfire or at sleepovers. Let’s carry on Alvin Shwartz and R. L. Stine’s legacy with a flashlight shining up from under our chins. Turn off the lights, chill your readers to the bone, and spook up their goosebumps with a combination of the weird and the strange. With just a touch of the inexplicable, you’ll be able to transport us all outside of our comfort zones.

Instructor: Julie Lemanski    Course: Characters in 3D: Resuscitating Lifeless Characters
What would The Hunger Games be without Katniss? Star Wars without Darth Vader? Imaginative, captivating characters take writing to new heights, and discovering and developing them can be the best part of writing. In Characters in 3D, we’ll resuscitate the lifeless and create multidimensional characters that think, feel, and react in ways that lift them off paper. We’ll save our static characters through use of original sensory details, vivid descriptions, tense conflicts, engaging character interactions, and unexpected plot twists. Ditch the dry descriptions and revamp your writing with Characters in 3D.

Instructor: Brooke Willis    Course: Quest: The Hero’s Journey
Seeking adventurous spirits with large imaginations.  Bring your guide (wise old men and fairy godmothers a plus), sidekicks, weapons, and special abilities.  We will provide the obstacles and a suitable villain.  Romances at no extra cost. Your choice of dragon, princess, toad, or sword with enrollment. Heroes eat for free. Dwarves, elves, and goblins permitted with pet deposit. Open to anyone who is ready to write themselves into a journey. So, remove all the layers of protective coats and explore your ideas and share your quest with others. Those who are ready to explore that Hero’s journey…..You are welcomed and this is the class for you.

Session 1 Afternoon Middle School Classes

Instructor: Mark Alford    Course: Fan Fiction: For Fanatics Only
This course is for those who are not satisfied with a story speaking to them, who feel the need to speak back. Take an existing world, be it science fiction, fantasy, action, video game, or other, and mold it into your image.  Want to know what would have happened if Luke Skywalker had missed when he fired on the Death Star?  Wish vampire hunter Blade would come after the sparkling Edward?  Like Harry Potter and want to find out what happens to James Sirius Potter when he goes to Hogwarts? Think Spider-Man should encounter the Joker?  Then, quit waiting for the authors, and write it yourself! Join us to explore the dark side of your favorite heroes. Join two worlds together and add our own characters into existing stories. Take this class and you will play with universes.

Instructor: Ting Lam    Course: Humor Writing: The Trickster and the Fool
Like to write stories but not sure how to add in a comic element? Let’s learn from the best of the best: Shakespeare, Homer, and other legend tellers of the past. From characters like the mischievous Puck, the wily Odysseus, the Cherokee wolf, and the Japanese kitsune, we learn that comedy is universal. After all, everyone loves to laugh and make fun of each other and themselves. With a little bit of oral poetics, we’ll be able to tell the best kind of stories about unsung tricksters and fools.

Instructor: Julie Lemanski    Course: Multigenre Writing: Finding the “Write” Form
It takes a little practice and exposure to find the “write” form--the one we feel most comfortable with and that brings out our best craft. In Multi-Genre Writing, we’ll experiment with science fiction, fantasy, narrative, and descriptive poetry and use various writing exercises to piece together products that mix and overlap genres. Campers will collaborate and rely heavily on peer workshops for inspiration and constructive feedback. Multi-Genre Writing will give you the opportunity to create action romance, fantasy mystery, and other unexpected combinations--be a part of the course that embodies it all.

Instructor: Scott Reintgen    Course: The “Grimm” Side of Fantasy
Once upon a time, before adorable woodland animals talked, before cheerful fairy godmothers solved all the problems with the wave of a magic wand, fairy tales were darker – much darker. In this course, we will start exploring the “grimmer” side of fantasy by looking at these fairy tales, as well as some other well-known works of darker fantasy such as Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Lois Lowry’s The Giver. We will discuss how to “darken” a work of fantasy without slipping into horror, focusing on what unsettles and scares us. But be warned: there will be no fluffy unicorns or dancing leprechauns in this class!

Instructor: Crystal Smith    Course: Paper Cuts: Words That Wound and Win
Influential leaders more often win with words than weapons. Learn how to write like a victor in this class as we explore argumentative writing. In this course, you will learn how to form a convincing argument leaving your opponents speechless. Come discover the alchemy of argument.

Instructor: Brooke Willis    Course: TV: Writing for the Small Screen
If you love television and are inspired by the innovation and originality we see in screenwriting today, this is the class for you!  Writing for the Small Screen is a course designed to give students an authentic experience in writing both drama and comedy for television.  This course will buzz with collaboration, punctuated by giggles and laughter. The course will emphasize the importance of writing skills unique to the medium of television, the genre of programs and appealing to specific audiences. Part of understanding great screenwriting is to study great TV! As a class, we will watch and discuss episodes written by Emmy-winning screen writers Joss Whedon (The Avengers), Steven Levitan (Modern Family), and other critically acclaimed writers such as Mindy Kaling and B.J. Novak (The Office) and many more. Let’s hit the TV screen running with creative ideas. Come and share yours with us!

Session 1 Morning High School Classes

Instructor: Margaret Chapman    Course: Fractured Tales: Experiments in Fiction
What makes a story? What breaks it? What happens after "happily-ever-after"? What happens when we throw out the rulebook of traditional storytelling and start writing things that don't even look like stories? We’ll read fractured stories—invented fairy tales without happy endings, stories that look like lists or tests or even poems(!), and retellings and reimaginings that subvert our expectations—and we’ll write our own fractured tales. 

Instructor: Andrew Coffey    Course: Limitless Limits: Experimental Fiction
The choices of form and medium are ours, even as we unconsciously slip into the modes of common practice to which we have grown accustomed. This course is about taking control of the works we create by breaking tradition or by imposing seemingly arbitrary limitations in order to stretch the possibilities of fiction beyond what is typically deemed normal. If you wish to test the boundaries of what constitutes a work of fiction, this course for you.

Instructor: Scott Michaels    Course: Journalism
Your newsroom, your story, your byline: your online paper. Our online newspaper will pop with hard news, features, opinion pieces and photos, all done by you. Students will select stories from different journalism genres, learn the processes to capture facts, interviews, crucial information to craft their story, with assistance as needed every step of the way. You’ll learn how to write for a newspaper and how to make even a mundane story sizzle. Experienced journalists who want to take it next level will learn new tricks to up your high school newspaper swagger. 

Instructor: Scott Reintgen    Course: Writing College Admissions Essays: Standing Out, Getting In
One of the most intimidating parts of applying to college can be writing your college essays. After all, how can you capture who you are in such a short space? This course is designed to teach you how to write an effective college entrance essay by relating a personal narrative that both reveals your character and reflects on a larger question (often specified by the university/college).  You'll learn to present your abilities and accomplishments in a unique way, practice with real application questions, and research colleges. We will also have guest speakers who work in college admissions give you insider advice on what they look for while reading essays for their representative schools.

Instructor: Crystal Smith    Course: A Literary Mash-up Workshop: Prose or Poetry or Both?
In this workshop setting, students gain an understanding of different genres, in this course, fictional prose and prose poetry. Students will use that knowledge to shake up their creative writing by combining the two elements to create truly unique work and by writing single ideas across both genres. We will look at an assortment of fictional prose including flash fiction, fantasy, and horror as well as notable prose poems and the Japanese form, Haibun.

Instructor: Barry Yeoman    Course: Writing for Multimedia Performance
Working collaboratively, we will write and then present a multimedia performance that combines words, music, and photography to bring alive a moment in history. This is a full-on team effort. Everyone helps choose the topic. Everyone writes. Everyone critiques. Everyone helps craft the material into a script. And everyone performs. Whether you’re a theater newbie or a Broadway star, there’s a place for you on this stage if you’re willing to work hard.

Session 1 Afternoon High School Classes

Instructor: Margaret Chapman    Course: Writing Women: Making Room for Your Voice
In this course you'll explore what it means to be a woman who writes, how women are portrayed in fiction, poetry and popular culture, and how you can make room for your voice. In writing about and listening to often-untold stories of female experience, we'll delve into territory that includes friendships and hardships, growing up and rebellion. We'll celebrate the bond we share as we shape our thoughts, revelations and reactions into journal entries, personal narratives, poetry and fiction, and we'll present a group piece for the final celebration.
 
Instructor: Andrew Coffey    Course: In the Flicker: Dark Fiction 
This course will explore the mysterious, the terrifying, and the grotesque: corruption, injustice, gnawing unease, the maddening effects of evil forces lurking just beyond perception.  The works we’ll strive to create will often be bleak or unsettling. Are there elements of the supernatural, barely comprehensible, at work in the fringes of society? Or are the terrors we discover entirely the product of human nature? Are the heroes we know and love really the monsters we sought all along? Let’s create and answer these questions together.
 
Instructor: Kevin Dublin    Course: Poetry and Performance
A poem and its voice are inseparable, whether that voice is inside of a reader’s head when on a page or against their ears from a stage. In this class, we will study poems and the performance of poetry in order to write and perform poetry to our fullest abilities. We’ll cover poets from Shakespeare to Rudy Francisco, from John Keats to J. Cole, from T.S. Elliot to Lana Del Rey, and a lot between—all in service of our own written words. There will be a lot of performance. If you want to take the class but are nervous, then you should definitely take it.
 
Instructor: Scott Michaels    Course: Creative Nonfiction: Finding Your Voice
Find your passion, find your voice, create your masterpiece. Students will pick a topic, and then pick a canvas. Compose a movie, music, restaurant review, memoir, feature story on someone at Duke or in Durham, etc. We’ll turn it into a blog post, podcast or submission in the DYWC online newspaper. You’ll use the facts as a jumping-off point to write pieces that also show who you are.
 
Instructor: Barry Yeoman    Course: Writing Men
Come join the band of brothers who find themselves transformed each summer by this one-of-a-kind class. We’ll be exploring many of life’s big issues—sports, romance, social pressures, violence, parents, competition, and adulthood—through fun games, serious conversations, and of course lots of writing. We’ll create a community of male writers that will outlast the two weeks of camp. And we’ll push the limits of both honesty and creativity. 
 

Session 2 Morning Middle School Classes

Instructor: Mark Alford    Course: Action Adventure: Ready, Set, Go!
You and your hero will join Max Phoenix in sword fights, booby traps, chase scenes, secret spy stuff, and more while you complete your quest for the ever-valuable MacGuffin.  There will be victories.  There will be sweat.  There will be death.  Action and adventure, while a genre all to itself, appears in almost every other genre from romance to sci fi.  So, learn how to pace the writing, set the scene, and to put as much drama and suspense into your work as you can.  Warning: ninjas, zombie pirates, and villains bent on world domination are constant interferences in this class (not to mention robot sharks with laser beams).  Not for the timid!  
 
Instructor: Justine Daniel    Course: Fiction: Let the Story Tell You
In this course students will gain inspiration for story ideas, plot/character development, and writing techniques from multiple sources. Music, film clips, art and fieldtrips are among the opportunities students will have to spark ideas to develop their own completed story (or stories). Whether you have little or much experience with writing stories this course will help develop your story and your writing style. Emphasis will be placed on learning techniques that push the writer out of their comfort zone and into more dynamic storytelling. This will provide exploration into literature students hadn’t considered and ways of developing story not yet imagined. This course will use a writer’s workshop model for campers to share, critique and revise stories while engaging in discussion. 
 
Instructor: Kevin Dublin    Course: Outer Poetry: Words Dance
Writing and sharing poetry is an act of performance. Our words sing and our words dance. The goal in this class is to write poems that perform beautifully; each day we will learn new techniques to help our words do exactly that. We’ll learn them from published and performed poems, from trips around Durham, and from each other’s work. We will collaborate with the world and then share our art. 
 
Instructor: Ting Lam    Course: Character Factory
Are your readers not convinced that your characters are truly in love or immediate best friends? Come craft a myriad of three-dimensional, well-rounded, and dynamic characters and learn how to develop them well throughout your story. These characters will advance the plot instead of falling victim to it. We’ll engage in a variety of exercises and physical and mental field trips to develop sophistication in our character building.
 
Instructor: Cassie Rooney    Course: Horror Fiction: Playing with Our Fears
H.P. Lovecraft, one of the most significant 20th-century horror writers, once argued, “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.”  This class will encourage students to tap into the dark and ominous abyss of their imaginations in order to craft novel tales devoid of cliché that are sure to make anyone shudder.  Come join us this summer as we explore the frightening works of some of the best in the genre and skillfully write original stories meant to be read around a campfire on a chilly night.  Just remember, this class is certainly not for the faint of heart!
 
Instructor: Leslie Schwartz    Course: Hero's Quest: From Achilles' Heel to #FirstWorldProblems
Saving the world has always been "all in a day's work" to the heroes of the universe. Yet, they always seem to stumble at the most importune times. This course will encourage students to investigate real-world heroes and real-world problems and investigate the ways we can all be daily heroes in the lives of others. Additionally, we will investigate what has made fictional superheroes so appealing to audiences, from Hercules to the Hulk, and use our real-world knowledge to begin creating the next big superhero that will appeal to modern audiences who have seen it all. We know that great power brings great responsibility, but not all of us have found our superpowers yet. All seventh sons, radioactive middle class children, half-mortal demi-goddesses, and unassuming pedestrians are welcome! Bring your cape. 
 

Session 2 Afternoon Middle School Classes

Instructor: Mark Alford    Course: Fan Fiction: For Fanatics Only
This course is for those who are not satisfied with a story speaking to them, who feel the need to speak back. Take an existing world, be it science fiction, fantasy, action, video game, or other, and mold it into your image.  Want to know what would have happened if Luke Skywalker had missed when he fired on the Death Star?  Wish vampire hunter Blade would come after the sparkling Edward?  Like Harry Potter and want to find out what happens to James Sirius Potter when he goes to Hogwarts? Think Spider-Man should encounter the Joker?  Then, quit waiting for the authors, and write it yourself! Join us to explore the dark side of your favorite heroes. Join two worlds together and add our own characters into existing stories. Take this class and you will play with universes.
 
Instructor: Justine Daniels    Course: Jump Starting Fiction: Scene Building
Each scene in a work of fiction holds the dramatic tension of plot and is a mini-plot of a novel. Each day of this session student will utilize multiple art forms as well as exercises created by the instructor to inspire the writing of fictional scenes in multiple genres. Utilizing the rich cultural resources of Duke’s campus, inspiration will stem from film, music, visual art, nature and common everyday places. Students will engage in writer’s workshops to build, discuss and revise scenes to use later in longer works of fiction or as a compilation of vignettes. Analysis of various authors’ writing styles will help students emulate and develop imagery, characterization, mood and theme. 
 
Instructor: Ormand Moore    Course: TV: Writing for the Small Screen
They say we're living in a golden age for TV.  This golden age isn't happening because the actors are better looking or the cameras more high-definition: the WRITERS are making incredible TV happen today.  In this class, you'll learn how to shape an entire story arc--serious or funny-- into a 30 minute (actually less: commercials!) show.  In addition to traditional narrative genres, we'll explore genres like variety shows, talk shows, and that monster, REALITY TV.  We'll kick back and watch some great television, but mostly we'll write, experiment, act (yes, we will act!), and film.  
 
Instructor: Scott Reintgen    Course: The “Grimm” Side of Fiction
Once upon a time, before adorable woodland animals talked, before cheerful fairy godmothers solved all the problems with the wave of a magic wand, fairy tales were darker – much darker. In this course, we will start exploring the “grimmer” side of fantasy by looking at these fairy tales, as well as some other well-known works of darker fantasy such as Neil Gaiman’s The Graveyard Book and Lois Lowry’s The Giver. We will discuss how to “darken” a work of fantasy without slipping into horror, focusing on what unsettles and scares us. But be warned: there will be no fluffy unicorns or dancing leprechauns in this class!
 
Instructor: Cassie Rooney    Course: Paper Cuts: Words That Wound and Win
Influential leaders more often times win with words than weapons.  After this course, you’ll no longer be accused of fallacious reasoning, for you’ll learn how to write like a victor as we explore the craft of argumentative writing.  This course will expose you to debate and speech, along with personal essay writing and even poetry! Come discover the alchemy of argument.
 
Instructor: Leslie Schwartz    Course: LOL -- Comedy Writing in the 21st Century
There is a rich history of comedy writing across the ages. From Ancient Greek actors "falling" off stages to modern Viners performing side-splitting stunts in 6 second loops, audiences have always loved a good laugh. This course will investigate several types of comedy, from plays to stand up to quickly evolving internet media, and then students will write and perform comedies of their own, again spanning various formats. Campers who love to laugh and are comfortable being the butt of a good joke are encouraged to sign up. Selfie-stick not required.

 

Session 2 Morning High School Classes

Instructor: Naima Coster    Course: Making the Unreal Real: Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Magical Realism
Gabriel García Márquez once said, “If you say that there are elephants flying in the sky, people are not going to believe you. But if you say that there are four hundred and twenty-five elephants flying in the sky, people will probably leave you.” In this course we will discover the many technique writers use to make us believe the unreal in their fiction. We will write and share stories that capture unreal worlds or that bring the fantastic and hard-to-believe into our world through vivid, compelling prose. Be ready to expand your imagination and write beyond the boundaries of our reality!
 
Instructor: Ormand Moore    Course: Journalism
Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Campers enrolled in Journalism will get a crash course in interviewing, news writing, editorial writing, copy-editing, page layout, and design. We will collaborate to create an online newspaper, complete with news, sports, and features articles, as well as editorials, columns, and cartoons. In addition to honing their writing skills, campers will have the chance to bring their perspective to local or global issues and voice their opinions. Come get the full journalism experience (press pass not included).
 
Instructor: Scott Reintgen    Course: Writing College Admissions Essays: Standing Out, Getting In
One of the most intimidating parts of applying to college can be writing your college essays. After all, how can you capture who you are in such a short space? This course is designed to teach you how to write an effective college entrance essay by relating a personal narrative that both reveals your character and reflects on a larger question (often specified by the university/college).  You'll learn to present your abilities and accomplishments in a unique way, practice with real application questions, and research colleges. We will also have guest speakers who work in college admissions give you insider advice on what they look for while reading essays for their representative schools.
 
Instructor: Crystal Smith    Course: Stranger Than Fiction: Go Ahead, Break the Rules
In Stranger Than Fiction, new ideas are what matter. Writers are free to play with characters, plot, forms, addressing the reader, perspective, time sequence, and other writing elements. In this course, you can break the rules! The goal of the experimental author is to challenge the reader’s expectations in unusual ways. We will review the conventional ways, the one rule is you need to know the current rules before you break them, and we will construct original work though methods of unique expression. 
 
Instructor: Meg Williamson    Course: Writing Women
Writing Women is designed to help young women pull expression up from their core and bring it forth in writing. Through poetry, fiction, and personal essay we will move past barriers of polite-silence and sometimes restrictive expectations often imposed on women by society. We will utilize writing exercises that give precedence to individual experiences, that bolster self-worth, and that explore the significance of women as a creative force. We will discuss relevant current events. We will choose as role models female writers who embody these strengths. We will boldly go where every woman ought to. Expect to be challenged and supported in a class where you will join a rich history of women who know they have much to say.  
 

Session 2 Afternoon High School Classes

Instructor: Naima Coster    Course: Experimental Fiction: Play and Risk
In this course, we will write fiction that surprises. I don’t mean a surprising plot twist or turn—in fact, there might not even be a plot in your story. We’re throwing out the rules of fiction to write stories that take risks and play with narrative conventions. We will play with point of view, language, plot, genre, and form. We will also play with digital platforms, such as Twitter, to practice new ways of telling stories. The writing produced in this class will be fresh and thrilling—the kind of writing that pushes the limits of what you know and believe yourself capable of creating.
 
Instructor: Kevin Dublin    Course: Hip Hop Poetry
Would you like to be fearless? Hip-Hop, more than anything, is an attitude. Hip-Hop Poetry explores what makes up this attitude by deconstructing hip-hop songs and culture to help create poems. There are no prerequisites for this class other than curiosity and a desire to write poems. Edgar Allan Poe is Hip-Hop (he had beefs), Gerard Manley Hopkins is Hip-Hop (he created new rhythms), and there are also contemporary poets today influenced by Hip-Hop artists like Kendrick Lamar, J. Cole, Eminem, and 2Pac. We will delve into freestyle and poetry ciphers, slams, spoken word, and other forms of performance. We will also answer the question: Is there a difference between Hip-Hop and Poetry?
 
Instructor: Ting Lam    Course: Phantasmagoria: Romance with a Capital R
It’s time to go back to the roots of today’s Phantasmagoria stories: the Gothic Romance. We’ll explore literature from all around Europe: Carmilla, Frankenstein, The Castle of Otranto, Der Sandmann, The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, and many more. We’ll also listen to the classical music and examine art of that time period to influence our writing. By playing with the sublime, we’ll combine the awe with the awful and see how twisted the strange can really be. In addition, we’ll take a look at modern Youtube and other media adaptations and observe, maybe even try our hand at, making the old into something new again.
 
Instructor: Crystal Smith    Course: Creative Nonfiction: Tell All the Truth, But Tell It Slant
Creative nonfiction is meant to amuse, as well as inform readers of true stories. From the humorous to the deadly serious, nonfiction writers make connections with what’s happening in the world by cataloging history, accounts, and personal experiences. In this course, we will look at methods of crafting essays and memoirs, along with the acclaimed works of Joan Didion, Larry Dane, and others alike.
 
Instructor: Meg Williamson    Course: Finding Your Voice
Some of the most common complaints we hear from young writers are “I don’t know what to write” or “I don’t know what my strengths are.” In this class, students rarely say that after the first day. One of the most exciting things we get to do as writers is to experiment with how we tell the stories we choose to tell. Using a mixture of exercises in short story, poetry, journaling, and personal narrative, we will challenge ourselves to explore the variety of narrative voices that we each have. How are we most comfortable expressing ourselves, our experiences, and our ideas? How are we least comfortable, and why? When we push ourselves beyond our comfort zones as writers, we often produce our most intimate and interesting work.  The goal of this class is to discover our most resonant voices—be they proud, happy, embarrassing, funny, or surprising—and share them.

 

Session 3 Morning Middle School Classes

Instructor: Mark Alford    Course: Action Adventure: Ready, Set, Go!
You and your hero will join Max Phoenix in sword fights, booby traps, chase scenes, secret spy stuff, and more while you complete your quest for the ever-valuable MacGuffin.  There will be victories.  There will be sweat.  There will be death.  Action and adventure, while a genre all to itself, appears in almost every other genre from romance to sci fi.  So, learn how to pace the writing, set the scene, and to put as much drama and suspense into your work as you can.  Warning: ninjas, zombie pirates, and villains bent on world domination are constant interferences in this class (not to mention robot sharks with laser beams).  Not for the timid!  
 
Instructor: Patricia Biela    Course: Multigenre Writing: A Kaleidoscope for the Page
You're in the greeting card section of your favorite bookstore and there are birthday cards written by you. Turn the kaleidoscope and you are in the Children's Lit zone and marvel at the shelves with your picture books. You walk into the cafe area, see a TV and the talk show host is asking questions you've written to guests and panelists. After you buy a smoothie and walk out of the door, you turn the kaleidoscope again and a bus passes by with your poem on it. You see your parent's car, hop in and the song you've written is on the radio. Sometimes dreams begin in writing camps, so please consider joining this journey, and write in multigenres as if your life depended on it.
 
Instructor: Naima Coster    Course: Characters in 3D: Getting to Know Them
The best characters are the ones we get to know as well as we know our friends—sometimes we get to know characters even better. How do you write a character that a reader can really get to know and understand? How do you, as the writer, get to know your characters? In Characters in 3D, we’ll complete exercises that help us bring characters to life on the page. We will pay attention to how characters speak, think, look, interact with each other, and, above all, how they change. 
 
Instructor: Nathan Dixon    Course: Humor Writing: Infinite Absurdities
While no one has ever done a stand-up job of defining just what humor is, almost everyone can identify a person or situation that’s funny.  In this class we’ll focus on the incongruities that make us laugh out loud and read excerpts from the masters of the absurd.  What if you woke up as a giant insect, or if the barber chopped off your nose?  What if you thought that you were a train engine, or walked backwards in time through the snow?  We’ll place ordinary people in bizarre situations and—vice versa—create over-the-top characters that make the most mundane tasks into herculean feats of strength.  While jokes and puns might well poke fun, we’ll stun the pants right off the reader, banana peels and horse-trade deals and laughter reels in a birdbrain feeder.
 
Instructor: Meredith Newlin    Course: Space and Time, Myth and Magic: Science Fiction and Fantasy
In a galaxy far, far away lie Wonderlands, Middle-earths, and empires where our imaginations work with elements of science, magic and myth to craft stories with ideas that come from anywhere and everywhere. In this class, we will keep our eyes and ears open to triggers for these ideas - often from the places we’d least expect them. We’ll create plot lines on planets, aliens on adventures, and creatures in other cultures. Dragons, swords, fairies, unicorns, and witches await only your pen to guide the way. There are no limitations on your license to cast a spell with your creativity!
 
Instructor: Cassie Rooney    Course: Paper Cuts: Words That Wound and Wind
Influential leaders more often times win with words than weapons.  After this course, you’ll no longer be accused of fallacious reasoning, for you’ll learn how to write like a victor as we explore the craft of argumentative writing.  This course will expose you to debate and speech, along with personal essay writing and even poetry! Come discover the alchemy of argument.
 
 

Session 3 Afternoon Middle School Classes

Instructor: Mark Alford    Course: Fan Fiction: For Fanatics Only
This course is for those who are not satisfied with a story speaking to them, who feel the need to speak back. Take an existing world, be it science fiction, fantasy, action, video game, or other, and mold it into your image.  Want to know what would have happened if Luke Skywalker had missed when he fired on the Death Star?  Wish vampire hunter Blade would come after the sparkling Edward?  Like Harry Potter and want to find out what happens to James Sirius Potter when he goes to Hogwarts? Think Spider-Man should encounter the Joker?  Then, quit waiting for the authors, and write it yourself! Join us to explore the dark side of your favorite heroes. Join two worlds together and add our own characters into existing stories. Take this class and you will play with universes.
 
Instructor: Nathan Dixon    Course: Quest: The Hero’s Journey
Now rise young kings and queens, young princes, princesses, and paupers, to ramble through the wild world beyond walls where danger wares no halter.  The hero wares a thousand faces, and in this class we’ll focus on creating a character that’s up to the task of overcoming the many trials that await him or her.  Yes, there will be secrets to keep and battles to fight, magical friends to make and villains to vanquish, but there are worlds beyond goblins and elves, beyond dwarves and ogres and dragons.  Scarier things than are dreamt of in our philosophy, and heroes from our own minds, ready to gallop through our foreheads and into these worlds where fate springs like thunder from their fingertips.
 
Instructor: Kevin Dublin    Course: Outer Poetry: Words Dance
Writing and sharing poetry is an act of performance. Our words sing and our words dance. The goal in this class is to write poems that perform beautifully; each day we will learn new techniques to help our words do exactly that. We’ll learn them from published and performed poems, from trips around Durham, and from each other’s work. We will collaborate with the world and then share our art. 
 
Instructor: Meredith Newlin    Course: Fiction: Let’s Make a Scene
It's hard to imagine Dorothy without Oz or Harry without Hogwarts. Unforgettable characters are essential to great stories, but such characters need equally memorable locales in which they think, speak, and act.  In this class, we'll learn how to weave convincing tales that paint colorful pictures inside our readers' imaginations-- not just telling what happens to our characters, but revealing exactly how, where and when it happens. The result will be dynamic scenes that keep our readers eager to turn the page for more.  Masterful scene-building is as close as your imagination. Come along for the ride!
 
Instructor: Cassie Rooney    Course: Horror Fiction: Playing with Our Fears
H.P. Lovecraft, one of the most significant 20th-century horror writers, once argued, “The oldest and strongest emotion of mankind is fear, and the oldest and strongest kind of fear is fear of the unknown.”  This class will encourage students to tap into the dark and ominous abyss of their imaginations in order to craft novel tales devoid of cliche that are sure to make anyone shudder.  Come join us this summer as we explore the frightening works of some of the best in the genre and skillfully write original stories meant to be read around a campfire on a chilly night.  Just remember, this class is certainly not for the faint of heart!
 
Instructor: Gideon Young    Course: Children’s Literature: The Power of Picture Books
In this class we will write literature for children, with a focus on the picture book genre! (No artistic confidence required!) We will examine format, narrative transitions, and the role of visuals!! Picture books have a particular power to enable readers to imagine, to observe, and especially, to learn. We will gather inspiration from Bill Peet’s amazing characters, Marilyn Nelson’s descriptive language in Snook Alone, cultural explorations, Laos, Looney Tunes, Native Americans, Dr. Seuss’s idealisms, current events, Adventure Time, and you!! Expect to read, write, share, peer-edit, perform, film & photograph, locally field trip, and listen to music!!! It’s gonna be Great!
 

Session 3 Morning High School Classes

Instructor: Kevin Dublin    Course: Poetry and Performance
A poem and its voice are inseparable, whether that voice is inside of a reader’s head when on a page or against their ears from a stage. In this class, we will study poems and the performance of poetry in order to write and perform poetry to our fullest abilities. We’ll cover poets from Shakespeare to Rudy Francisco, from John Keats to J. Cole, from T.S. Elliot to Lana Del Rey, and a lot between—all in service of our own written words. There will be a lot of performance. If you want to take the class but are nervous, then you should definitely take it.
 
Instructor: Tracie Fellers    Course: Writing Women
In this course, we'll discover and explore the power of our voices as women, and draw inspiration from powerhouse writers like Toni Morrison, Margaret Atwood and Jhumpa Lahiri.  In writing about and listening to often-untold stories of female experience, we'll delve into territory that includes friendships between girls and growing up; rebellion and discovery; shattering polite silence and defying expectations. We'll celebrate the bond we share as we shape our thoughts, revelations and reactions along the way into journal entries, personal narratives, poetry and fiction. Join us on the journey! 
 
Instructor: Ting Lam    Course: Phantasmagoria: Romance with a Capital R
It’s time to go back to the roots of today’s Phantasmagoria stories: the Gothic Romance. We’ll explore literature from all around Europe: Carmilla, Frankenstein, The Castle of Otranto, Der Sandmann, The Hunchback of Notre-Dame, and many more. We’ll also listen to the classical music and examine art of that time period to influence our writing. By playing with the sublime, we’ll combine the awe with the awful and see how twisted the strange can really be. In addition, we’ll take a look at modern Youtube and other media adaptations and observe, maybe even try our hand at, making the old into something new again.
 
Instructor: Ormand Moore    Course: Journalism
Extra! Extra! Read all about it! Campers enrolled in Journalism will get a crash course in interviewing, news writing, editorial writing, copy-editing, page layout, and design. We will collaborate to create an online newspaper, complete with news, sports, and features articles, as well as editorials, columns, and cartoons. In addition to honing their writing skills, campers will have the chance to bring their perspective to local or global issues and voice their opinions. Come get the full journalism experience (press pass not included).
 
Instructor: Barry Yeoman    Course: Writing for Multimedia Performance
Working collaboratively, we will write and then present a multimedia performance that combines words, music, and photography to bring alive a moment in history. This is a full-on team effort. Everyone helps choose the topic. Everyone writes. Everyone critiques. Everyone helps craft the material into a script. And everyone performs. Whether you’re a theater newbie or a Broadway star, there’s a place for you on this stage if you’re willing to work hard.
 
Instructor: Gideon Young    Course: Shape-shifting Stories
Join us!!! Try your hand at writing in various genres! Learn to create and manipulate your stories and ideas across fiction, comics, poetry, narrative essays, playwriting, screenwriting, picture books, interviews, etcetera!! Imagine a story (your story) that, every few pages, transforms through styles like Brown Girl Dreaming, El Deafo, Diary of a.., Barry Yeoman, Carver: A Life in Poems, Tennessee Williams, Kendrick Lamar, Between Two Ferns, Calvin & Hobbes, and more! This is a class in which everyone will write and explore their creativity through multiple lenses! Come Write, Shape-Shift, Read, Field Trip, Peer-Edit, and Share!! It’s gonna be Great!
 

Session 3 Afternoon High School Classes

Instructor: Patricia Biela    Course: Experimental Fiction in the Age of Twitter: Brain Boggling
We will push past the traditional ideals of writing. We will create short stories in 140 characters or less. We will watch our antagonists and protagonists find creative ways to get what they want--even if it means drawing it (like Harold did in Harold and the Purple Crayon). We will shape concrete poems through typographical whimsy. We will explore paradox and watch our characters brain boggle.
 
Instructor: Naima Coster    Course: Making the Unreal Real: Science Fiction, Fantasy, and Magical Realism
Gabriel García Márquez once said, “If you say that there are elephants flying in the sky, people are not going to believe you. But if you say that there are four hundred and twenty-five elephants flying in the sky, people will probably leave you.” In this course we will discover the many technique writers use to make us believe the unreal in their fiction. We will write and share stories that capture unreal worlds or that bring the fantastic and hard-to-believe into our world through vivid, compelling prose. Be ready to expand your imagination and write beyond the boundaries of our reality!
 
Instructor: Tracie Fellers    Course: Finding Your Voice
Not sure about what to write, or what your strengths are when you go to the page, laptop or tablet?  Think of this class as your own personal GPS — one that will guide your exploration of multiple narrative paths. One of the most exciting things we get to do as writers is experiment with how we tell the stories we choose to tell. Using a mixture of activities in short story, poetry, journaling, and personal narrative, we'll challenge ourselves to explore the variety of narrative voices that we each have within.  When we push ourselves beyond our comfort zones as writers, we often produce our most intimate and interesting work.  The goal of this class is to discover our most resonant voices—whether they are pensive, proud, embarrassing, funny, or surprising—and share them.
 
Instructor: Ting Lam    Course: Experimental Fiction: Diverse Characters
Are you interested in representing marginalized characters as main characters in your next work of literature? Not sure how to write a character who is a different race or gender from you without perpetuating stereotypes? In this class, we’ll have frank and honest discussions about stepping into other people’s shoes. We’ll take a look at classic and contemporary examples and read some pep talks from various authors. We’ll try our hand at some exercises to create diverse characters and then we can start finding a sincere and respectful way to tell other people’s stories.
 
Instructor: Ormand Moore    Course: Writing College Admissions Essays: Standing Out, Getting In
This course is designed to teach you how to craft an effective entrance essay for your college applications. By the end of the course, each student will have prepared two essays and a formal resume. We will begin our work by analyzing various essay prompts, and essays from successful applicants. Throughout the writing process, students will participate in peer revision as well as receive regular feedback from the instructor. You'll learn to create a narrative that presents your accomplishments and character. In addition to practicing with real application questions, students will also role-play admission interviews.
 
Instructor: Barry Yeoman    Course: Writing Men
Come join the band of brothers who find themselves transformed each summer by this one-of-a-kind class. We’ll be exploring many of life’s big issues—sports, romance, social pressures, violence, parents, competition, and adulthood—through fun games, serious conversations, and of course lots of writing. We’ll create a community of male writers that will outlast the two weeks of camp. And we’ll push the limits of both honesty and creativity. 
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Staff

Mitch Cox (Academic Director), B.A., Wake Forest; M.A., Duke University

Mitch is the Academic Director for all three sessions of the Duke Young Writers’ Camp. During the school year, he teaches college composition for high school seniors and journalism and advanced journalism at Gloucester High School in Gloucester, Virginia. He is a published poet and essayist.

You can contact the Academic Director at prof.mitch@gmail.com.

Mark Alford, B.A., UNCW; MAT-E, UNCW

I believe that good writing comes from reading and noting how good authors have handled their craft. I love reading, but my preferred book is anything with action in it, be it spies, knights, wizards, or superheroes. I received both my degrees from UNC Wilmington and have taught high school English (9-12) as well as a few middle school and community college classes for the past 18 years. If I'm not teaching, reading, or writing, I'll be found coaching swimming or playing with my two boys or my daughter.

Patricia Biela,  B.A., University of Virginia

Biela is a native of Maryland with a BA in Psychology. A first generation American, she is of Angolan paternal and Haitian maternal descent. Biela is a Cave Canem South Fellow and has participated in 18 writing workshops including Callaloo, Cave Canem South, How Writers Write Poetry--International Writing Program-The University of Iowa, Hurston/Wright, The Muse, Provincetown, and Dr. Tony Medina's Poetry Boot Camp. Her poems appear in Barely South Review, Berkeley Poetry Review, The Caribbean Writer, Drumvoices Revue, and World Haiku Review among others. She has a poem exhibited in Epiphany Salon and Spa, Washington, D.C. Biela has editing experience, and written over 25 articles, some of which appear in Brainworld Magazine and Funds for Writers—Writing Kid. She is a third generation educator and teaches a recurring poetry workshop in the Chamberlin Retirement Community in Hampton, VA. Biela is honored to be a part of the Duke Young Writers' Camp teaching family.

Margaret Patton Chapman, MFA, The School of the Art Institute of Chicago

Margaret is the author of the novella-in-flash Bell and Bargain,published in 2014 as part of the collection My Very End of the Universe. Her very short fiction has appeared in WigleafThe Collagist,Elimae, and the anthology The Way We Sleep, among others, and her music and arts reporting has been published in the Independent Weekly and the Austin Chronicle. She has taught writing as an instructor at The Iowa Summer Writers’ Festival and as a Visiting Professor at Indiana University South Bend.  She is prose editor fordecomP magazine, and lives in Durham, NC. Find more of her work at margaretpattonchapman.com.

Andrew Coffey, B.A. UNC-Chapel Hill, B.A. Appalachian State University, M.A.T. UNC-Chapel Hill

When he’s not reading or camping or playing table-top games, Andrew teaches literature to high schoolers. He believes that the best writers are avid readers, so he strives to instill a love of reading into his students. His favorite authors include David Foster Wallace, Margaret Atwood and George Saunders, and he often cites Brave New World as his favorite book.

Namia Coster, B.A. in English and African American Studies, Yale University; M.A. in English and Writing, Fordham University; M.F.A. in Fiction, Columbia University

Naima Coster is a devoted writer of fiction and nonfiction. She is a native of Brooklyn, New York, but she lives now in Durham, North Carolina where she is finishing up her first novel, Halsey Street. Her stories have been published in The New York Times, Arts & Letters, Guernica, A Practical Wedding, and The Rumpus.  She has taught writing in a variety of contexts, from summer camp to prison, after-school programs, and Columbia University. When she isn’t writing, she enjoys reading, swimming, tea, Buffy, and going on hikes with her toy Australian Shepherd.

Justine LaMantia DanielBA from SUNY Oneonta in English and Secondary Education and a minor in Creative Writing, MA in Curriculum and Instruction with a focus in middle grades from North Carolina State University

Justine is currently in her tenth year of teaching language arts and this is her second year with DYWC. Justine holds certification from Duke University in teaching Academically & Intellectually Gifted students and has co-taught the class “Poetry and Pop Culture” at the Duke summer TIP program. She has earned the title 2009-2010 Teacher of the Year at Sherwood Githens Middle School and has been a member of a Durham Public Schools’ Educational Action Research Team that traveled to Mexico to teach and learn about the culture. Justine loved her experience as a Capital Area Writing Project (CAWP) Fellow at NC State University where she learned various writing activities and methods of conducting writing workshops with students. As language arts department chair, Justine also advises the Creative Writing Club at her school and has started the Githens Middle School Literary Magazine.

Nathan Dixon, B.A., UNC-Chapel Hill

Nathan Dixon is an English Literature MA candidate at North Carolina Central University.  In the wandering years between stints of school he traveled from the granite cathedral of Yosemite to the land of the long white cloud in New Zealand, from the backwoods of North Carolina and Kentucky and West Virginia looking for rocks to climb to the Big Apple where he slung waffles from the window of a big yellow truck.  Now back in Durham, he is the assistant editor of the academic journal Renaissance Papers.  His fiction and nonfiction have appeared in Tin House, the North Carolina Literary Review, Bop Dead City and Trans Lit Mag.  He’s stoked to join the staff at the Duke Young Writers’ Camp.

Kevin Dublin, B.A. and B.F.A., UNC-Wilmington, M.A., East Carolina U, M.F.A., San Diego State

All classes, to me, are a collaborative learning effort. We each have something to learn from one another, and I see myself more as a guide than anything else. I’ve edited pieces for journals, ran a micro press, moderated workshops, taught writing courses, and I’ve always been interested in fostering the talent of young writers and helping them see that anything they want to do is possible. When I’m not writing poems or scripts, reading poets like Jericho Brown or Gerard Manley Hopkins, or watching film/TV like Avengers or Doctor Who, I’m running around with my two younglings. This is my fifth year at DYWC, and it feels like home.

Tracie Fellers, B.S., Northwestern University;  M.A., North Carolina State University; MFA, UNC-Greensboro

I am a Durham native and freelance writer and editor who started my career writing for daily newspapers in North Carolina and Virginia. My recent work includes essays for Walter magazine and fiction in the literary journal Obsidian. Now an adjunct lecturer in the mass communication department at N.C. Central University, I also have taught writing and literature at N.C. A&T State University, Guilford College, Bennett College and N.C. State.  As a fiction and nonfiction writer, I am convinced that stories are essential to our lives — and that has everything to do with my approach to teaching writing. Whatever the genre or focus might be, I encourage my students, often writing with them, to delve into what matters most to us as human beings: their desires, fears, hopes, secrets, dreams. My fiction has appeared in Obsidian, Long Story Short: Flash Fiction by Sixty-Five of North Carolina’s Finest Writers, and roger;  I have published creative nonfiction in 27 Views of Raleigh, an anthology, and the journal Sing Heavenly Muse!  I’ve also been honored to receive awards for my fiction from N.C. State and the National Council for Black Studies. 

Ting Lam, B.A. & M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

I believe one of the most important skills as a writer is to be a good observer and listener. Careful observation, introspection, and reflection lead to concrete descriptions and dynamic narratives. My classes at DYWC often ask students to bring in various skills outside of writing as inspiration: art, music, and technology. These days, I teach high school English in Chatham County, write poetry, and participate in NaNoWriMo. Other days, you can find me chasing phantom runners, going on sketch crawls, and training to become the next Jedi master. I’m so glad to be back at Duke Young Writers’ Camp!

Julie Lemanski, B.A., Penn State University; M.A., East Carolina University

Julie Lemanski is currently a middle school English Language Arts teacher in Orange County, NC where she is involved with AVID and Student Government Association. She also coaches cross country and track in Durham County, NC. Prior to her work locally, Julie taught English I and II and a journalism course at Northwest Halifax High School in Littleton, NC and was a Teach For America Eastern North Carolina corps member. Julie attended Penn State where she was passionately involved in the Dance Marathon and wrote for the Daily Collegian. Julie is a native of Western Massachusetts and enjoys spending time running, reading, writing, traveling, and being with friends.

Scott Michaels, B.A. from the University of Michigan in communications and journalism; teaching certification from NC Central University

Scott began his career in print and radio, then transitioned to television for more than 10 years.  While working as a TV news journalist, Scott developed, wrote, produced, photographed, edited, and reported stories for the evening news on a daily basis.   In his tenure in television, he won awards for Best Use of Medium and Best Spot News Coverage.  Always looking for a new challenge, Scott left TV to become a teacher.  Over the last 15 years, he has taught reading, writing, English/Language Arts, broadcast journalism, and AVID to elementary through high school students with the bulk of his experiences in middle grades.  Outside the classroom, he has become a legendary, middle school soccer coach, leading his team to 6 district championships in 8 years.  In addition to teaching and coaching, he is a small business owner - managing the social media and marketing for the business and is a contributing blogger to the website.  After living in New York, Vermont, Nebraska, and Michigan, Scott has called Durham, North Carolina home for 19 years where he and his wife raise their three mid-sized kids.
 

Ormand Moore, B.A. and M.A.T. from University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Ormand teaches English to 11th and 12th graders at Durham School of the Arts.  Before that, he taught English at Chapel Hill High School for eleven years.  He holds to the contention that listening to audiobooks is, in fact, reading.  When looking for a place to live, Ormand believes that where the bookshelves would go is absolutely the first and most important consideration.  He enjoys rolling on the floor and laughing with his two young sons and watching funny cat videos with them.  He’s excited to be back for his fourth summer at DYWC.

Meredith Newlin, B.A., UNC-Asheville

Meredith has enjoyed teaching all ages since she was old enough to babysit and has been writing poems and stories since she was old enough to hold a pencil.  She majored in French, minored in English and studied a semester in Paris.  One of her first jobs after college was writing short articles for the inflight magazines of United, USAirways, and Delta. She has enjoyed teaching English at the middle and high school level for 10 years as well as a couple of semesters at Rockingham Community College.   She draws inspiration for lessons from just about anywhere, especially from what might appeal to her students' interests. One of her favorite challenges about being a teacher of writing is assisting students in mastering the technical aspects of writing -- composition, grammar, etc. -- while unlocking their creative potential. Meredith has a passion for jogging, cooking, live music, live theatre, and films, and loves to explore new places by foot, bicycle, bus, train, plane, or automobile. Above all she  treasures her family; her 18-month old daughter, Eleanor, inspires a new dimension and excitement to discovery and energizes Meredith to bring that sense of wonder into the classroom.

Scott Reintgen, B.A. The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.A.T. North Carolina State University

C.S. Lewis once said, "We read to know that we are not alone." For as long as I can remember, I've read fantasies and adventures and captivating stories. Whether in Edmund's betrayal of Narnia, Jon Snow's journey beyond The Wall, or Kvothe's calling of the wind, I have always found something in literature that makes me feel like I'm not the only one with a really weird brain. So I love writing and I love reading, so much so that both of my careers center on those subjects. I teach high school English and Creative Writing, but I’m also about to be a published author. My young adult sci-fi novel, THE BLACK HOLE OF BROKEN THINGS, will debut in 2017 from an imprint of Random House books. Like most of what I write, it was inspired by and written for my ridiculously awesome students. I live in North Carolina, though my wife and I did just have a year of amazing adventures living in Switzerland.

Cassie Rooney, B.S., State University of New York at Oneonta; M.A., The College of Saint Rose

I am a native upstate New Yorker that left the snowy Catskill Mountains five years ago in search of something new.  I absolutely love North Carolina and continue to relish in the delicious food and amazing climate of the Triangle.  I have taught English for seven years, and my insatiable love of reading, especially mysteries, and writing has only grown.  Several years ago I had the privilege of seeing Taylor Mali perform some of his poems, and he commented on the fact that the best writers are those that write about what frightens them the most.  This simple statement continues to stick with me, and I find myself feeling the most creative when I am reading or writing a piece that does just that.  Besides being a teacher and aspiring writer, you will find me trolling my favorite food blogs for yummy recipes and running an obscene amount of miles on the weekends.

Leslie Schwartz, B.A. and M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Leslie Schwartz (formerly Leslie Taylor) is excited to return to the Duke Young Writers' Camp this summer! Leslie works as a middle school ELA teacher by day and runs a highly-competitive, top-secret attack penguin training program by night. On any given weekend, you may find her curled up with a burrito and a good book. Lately reading a lot of nonfiction, she is still a Potterhead at heart and will be a Ravenclaw until she dies. Favorite authors span the likes of Elizabeth Gilbert, Jane Austen, David Sedaris, and Mindy Kaling. Favorite foods span the likes of anything that can be served with chips and salsa to anything that can reasonably be covered in chocolate and crumbled peanuts.

Crystal Smith, MFA, Queens University of Charlotte

Crystal Simone Smith is the author two poetry chapbooks, Routes Home (Finishing Line Press) and Running Music (Longleaf Press). Her work has appeared in numerous journals including: Callaloo, Nimrod, Barrow Street, Obsidian II: Literature in the African Diaspora, African American Review, and Mobius: The Journal of Social Change. She is an alumna of the Callaloo Creative Writing Workshop and the Yale Summer Writers Conference. She lives in Durham, NC with her husband and two sons where she teaches English Composition and Creative Writing. She is the Managing Editor of Backbone Press.
 

Meg Williamson, M.F.A., Hollins University, B.A. UNC-Chapel Hill

I have been very lucky to study with wonderful writers in my undergraduate and graduate careers, including my favorites, Lee Smith, Doris Betts, and Jill McCorkle. All of these women impressed me with both the strength of their voices and their commitment to fostering future generations of writers.  One of my dearest hopes is to help my students develop their voices, craft, and confidence the way my best teachers did for me. I currently teach, as well work as a freelance editor and advisor for high school and college students in their admissions applications, scholarship applications, and interview preparation. I look forward to the opportunity of teaching my first love, creative writing, for the fifth year this summer at Duke.

Brooke Willis, B. A. University of North Carolina at Greensboro- Dual Degree in Theater and African American History

Brooke is excited to be back with Duke Young Writers’ Camp. I am currently teacher at Southeast High School. My main teaching responsibilities include US History and World History. In my years of teaching, I have taught Theater, as well as IB Theory of Knowledge. I look forward to encouraging my students step outside the box, and discover the true writer within. When I am not teaching, I am spending time and traveling with my husband Travis and my two daughters, Makenzi and Maci.

Barry Yeoman, B.A., New York University

I am a freelance magazine journalist whose work appears in The American Prospect, Parade, Audubon, OnEarth, Saturday Evening Post, and many other magazines. I also produce long-form radio documentaries and nonfiction multimedia projects, including THE GUTBUCKET KING, a biography of the New Orleans bluesman Little Freddie King. I have been an instructor at DYWC for 19 years, mostly working with older teenagers. My classes are highly interactive and often involve physical activities. They require significant engagement from every student, including stretching their writing styles and reading aloud in class. I am a particular fan of book- and magazine-length narrative nonfiction. Favorite recent books have included THE IMMORTAL LIFE OF HENRIETTA LACKS (Rebecca Skloot), BEHIND THE BEAUTIFUL FOREVERS (Katherine Boo), and THE BIG TRUCK THAT WENT BY (Jonathan Katz).

Gideon Young, B.A. in Literature from the University of Connecticut; M.A. in Elementary Education from NCSU

Gideon is a native of Connecticut. A member of the Carolina African-American Writers’ Collective and the Haiku Society of America, his poetry has appeared in journals and anthologies such as Obsidian: Literature in the African Diaspora, Backbone Press, Spillway, Black Gold, and The Long River Review. During the school year, he works as a Title 1 Elementary Reading Teacher in Orange County, North Carolina. In past summers, Gideon directs, sings, leads, and teaches for YMCA camps, outdoor adventure & backpacking camps, and now is glad to be part of the DYWC teaching team.
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Guest Speakers

Session 1: Thursday, June 23

An inspiring speaker and entertaining performer, John Claude Bemis brings his passions for music, folklore, and spinning exciting tales to his novels and presentations. The first novel in his Clockwork Dark trilogy, The Nine Pound Hammer, was nominated for the North Carolina Children’s Book Award and was selected as a New York Public Library Best Children’s Book for Reading and Sharing. The trilogy continues with The Wolf Tree and The White City and has been described as “original and fresh” and “a unique way of creating fantasy.” His latest novel is Out of Abaton: The Wooden Prince.

A musician and educator, John lives with his wife and daughter in Hillsborough, NC. [Adapted/Excerpted from John Bemis’ website]

We’re excited to have John join us as a guest speaker this summer. Learn more about him by visiting his website.

Session 2: Thursday, July 14

Singer, lyricist, and poet, Kim Arrington is a veteran Duke Young Writers’ Camp instructor. In 2013, she released Getting II Yes (Collective Bull), her second album; this release followed her 2008 premiere album, First Love Note of Kim Arrington (Collective Bull). Both albums feature original songs by her. The Lapis Dwellers, her first volume of poetry, appeared in 2005 when the Independent Weekly voted it Best Poetry Book. Her work has also been published in Black Arts Quarter, Southern Quarterly, and Drumvoices Revue. She is currently working on her third CD, Make Your Luck.

We’re excited to have Kim join us as a guest speaker this summer. Learn more about her by visiting her website.

Session 3: Thursday, July 28

An alumnus of Duke Young Writers’ Camp, Justin Taylor is author of the short story collections Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever and Flings: Stories and the novel The Gospel of Anarchy. Everything Here Is the Best Thing Ever was a New York Times Editors’ Choice. Justin lives in New York City.

We’re excited to have Justin join us as a guest speaker this summer. Learn more about him by visiting his website.

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Living Options

Residential Campers

Residential participants in the Young Writers' Camp will live on Duke’s East Campus for the duration of the program. They will live in Blackwell Residence Hall, an air-conditioned residence hall on Duke's East Campus and eat their meals in the campus dining halls. They are expected to have the independence and maturity to make responsible decisions for themselves about their health and safety, and to interact cooperatively with other members of the program community.

Day Campers

The drop off and pick up location for all day campers will be White Lecture Hall. All day campers must check in on Monday morning between 9:00 am – 9:30 am am. At check-in, day campers will pick up class assignments, camp T-shirt, writing supplies, and other important camp information and other important camp information.

Tentative Daily Schedule for Day Campers

9:00 am – Drop-off at White Lecture Hall
12:45 pm – Lunch (included in tuition)
4:30 pm – Pick-up at White Lecture Hall (unless otherwise specified)

Transportation for Day Campers

Day campers and their families must arrange transportation to and from campus every day. Please note that classes begin promptly at 10:00 am am and end at 4:30 pm pm Monday through Friday the first week, and Monday through Thursday the second week. Staff members are not available to supervise day campers before the designated drop-off time or after the indicated pick up times.

If the camper will not be attending class for any reason on a particular day, please call the administrative office at (919) 684-2827 by 8:30 am to leave a message with the Duke Youth Programs staff specialist.

Extended Day Campers

All extended day campers must check in on Monday morning at White Lecture Hall between 9:00 am – 9:30 am am. At check-in, day campers will pick up class assignments, camp T-shirt, writing supplies, and other important camp information, and other important camp information.

Tentative Daily Schedule for Extended Day Campers

9:00 am – Drop-off at White Lecture Hall
12:45 pm – Lunch (included in tuition)
6:00 pm – Dinner
7:00 pm – Evening activities
9:00 pm – Extended day campers depart

Please note that classes begin promptly at 10:00 am am and end at 4:30 pm pm Monday through Friday the first week, and Monday through Thursday the second week. Campers participating in the extended-day option will return to the residence hall with the residential students. A counselor will be assigned to supervise this group of campers.

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What to Bring

Necessities

  • Sheets: extra-long twin set or two regular flat sheets, pillow, pillow cases
  • Warm blanked or heavy comforter (can be chilly in dorm)
  • Sweatshirt or jacket for inside dorm
  • Casual clothing: light cotton is recommended (summer weather in Durham is hot, usually 80-90 degrees, and humid). Please include:
    • Quick-drying shorts
    • T-shirts and/or cool summer tops
    • rain gear
    • hat with brim
    • 2 pairs of shoes - one pair must be closed-in, tie-on, sneaker type shoes that won't pull off in wet, muddy conditions (please note: Tevas or other type of sandals are not suitable as tie-on shoes); the second pair will be necessary when the first pair is wet!
  • Towels, washcloths
  • Clothes hangers (if you want to hang clothes)
  • Toiletries - fragrance free and don't forget sunscreen!
  • Alarm clock
  • Quarters and laundry detergent, if needed (instructions on doing laundry might be a good idea too!)
  • Favorite athletic equipment: tennis racket, etc. (We furnish Frisbees, nerf-balls, and other outdoor and indoor toys & games)
  • Insect repellent
  • Sunscreen - fragrance free!
  • Bee-sting kit - for those allergic to bee stings

Leave at home

What to leave at home: Neither the Program nor Duke University assumes responsibility for broken, lost, or stolen personal items.

  • Expensive sound, photographic, video or computer equipment
  • Refrigerators are prohibited

What we provide

  • 3-ring binder
  • Writing paper
  • Pens
  • Program T-shirt
  • Transportation from/to airport ($35 one way; $70 round trip)

Cell phones

Parents: Please read!

We know that parents and children value the ability to be able to call each other at a moment’s notice. For that reason, we do not prohibit cell phones at camp.

Parents are responsible for setting clear guidelines for cell phone use with their student.

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Coming & Going

Registration and Orientation – Day Campers

All Young Writers' Camp residential participants must check into the Blackwell Residence Hall between 2:00 pm and 4:00 pm on registration day (Sunday (1st Session: 6/19; 2nd Session: 7/10; 3rd Session: 7/24). Participants will NOT be able to check in prior to 2:00 pm. - See more at: http://learnmore.duke.edu/youth/youngwriter

The classes will meet in White Lecture, Friedl and East Duke.

Before and After Camp Care

Drop Off: 8:00 – 9:30 am $45
Pick Up: 4:30 – 5:30 pm $27

Drop Off and Pick Up (9 days) $65
Late Fee of $5 per 5 minutes after 5:30 pm

Drop Off & Pick Up Location: White Lecture Hall 

No activities will be provided. Campers will be supervised by residential camp counselor. Payment is for the duration of the camp. No prorated fees allowed. To register, contact the registration office at (919) 684-6259.

Registration & Orientation - Extended Day Campers

All Extended-Day Campers should check-in on Monday (1st Session: 6/20; 2nd Session: 7/11; 3rd Session: 7/25) on the front steps of White Lecture Hall at 8:30 am. At check-in, campers will pick up a camp t-shirt, notebook, and other supplies. Campers should be picked up on the front steps of White Lecture Hall by 4:00. Extended-Day Campers should plan to attend dinner and participate in the Sunday evening orientation and activities.

The classes will meet in White Lecture, Friedl and East Duke.

Registration and Orientation – Residential Campers

All Young Writers' Camp residential participants must check into the Blackwell Residence Hall between 2:00 pm and 4:00 pm on registration day (Sunday (1st Session: 6/19; 2nd Session: 7/10; 3rd Session: 7/24)). Participants will NOT be able to check in prior to 2:00 pm.

Parents/guardians are invited to visit with staff members and to ask any last minute questions. Please note that there are no structured activities during the check-in period, but residential staff will be in the residence hall to help students get settled in their rooms and encourage campers to begin getting to know one another in an informal setting.

Prior to dinner, students will meet with their Living Group Counselor. After dinner, campers will participate in a camp-wide orientation session, addressing schedules, expectations, rules, and activities to build the camp community.

Arrival

If driving – All participants arriving by car must plan to complete check-in at the residence hall on Sunday by 5:00 pm.

If arriving by train – Students traveling by train should plan to arrive at the Durham Amtrak Station on the appropriate Sunday between the hours of 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm.

If flying – Please make arrangements to arrive at the Raleigh-Durham International Airport on the appropriate Sunday between the hours of 1:00 pm and 4:00 pm.

Transportation will not be available before 1:00 pm or after 4:00 pm.

If a camper arrives before 1:00 pm, s/he will have to wait until 1:00 pm to be transported to campus. Please accurately record your flight information on the transportation form you receive from our office. If the airline changes your flight schedule, please notify us immediately.

SHUTTLES WILL BE PROVIDED TO AND FROM THE RALEIGH-DURHAM INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT AND THE DURHAM AMTRACK STATION ON A LIMITED BASIS.

The cost of the airport shuttle service is $35.00 from RDU to campus; $35.00 from campus to RDU. ($70.00 round trip).

Unaccompanied Minors

If your child is flying, it is necessary to check with the airlines whether or not your child will be considered an "unaccompanied minor." Each airline has different age classifications. If your child is classified as an "unaccompanied minor" it is imperative that you record this information on your travel form or give this information to the Duke Youth Programs Office at (919) 684-2827 or email youth@duke.edu. Failure to do so will result in a fee of $30 one way.

Airlines require the name, address and telephone number of the person(s) who will meet the student who is traveling as an unaccompanied minor. We cannot provide that information to you at this time. A staff member of the Youth Programs will contact you 2 - 3 days before the departure date to notify you of the name(s) of the staff members (wearing Duke Youth Program staff T-shirts) who will meet your child at the arrival gate. You then must give this information to the airline with which your child will be traveling. Please ensure that Duke Youth Programs has the correct contact information where you can be reached during those 2-3 days before the camp begins.

For Campers Not Considered Unaccompanied Minors

A staff member, who can be identified by Duke Youth Programs staff T-shirts, will meet participants at the baggage claim area.

If you are delayed – On arrival day, if your flight is delayed, or you are delayed in your journey by car and will not arrive by the requested time, please call (919) 684-2827. If you reach ananswering machine at that number, please leave a message; messages will be checked regularly.

Departure

Participants must check out of the residence hall before noon on Friday. Participants who are flying home must schedule flight departures from the Raleigh-Durham International Airport between 8:00 am and noon. Shuttles will transport participants to the airport during this time frame only. “Unaccompanied minors” will have a staff member escort them to the departure gate.

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Registration

Online

  1. Click on the green Register Now button.  
  2. To check availability in the camp for the appropriate category of camper, click on the exclamation point next to the appropriate tuition profile (example: Day Camper - Fee).
  3. Add the camp section you want to the shopping cart and then select the appropriate course fee. When you begin the checkout process, you will be asked to create a new user account, if you do not already have one.
  4. You must select the Youth Participant option when creating a new student account. Youth Participants must have the parent or guardian's email, phone, and address as the preferred contact information so please have a parent or guardian help you register. 
  5. The Youth Participant profile requires a date of birth, a grade level, and a youth email address.  If you do not have a youth email address or do not wish to enter one, you can enter that of the parent or guardian.
  6. Returning campers should log back into the system with their username and password from the previous summer. If you do not have your login information, please click on the "forgot username" and "forgot password" links from the Student Login Portal of our web site, or call the registration’s office at (919) 684-6259 to obtain your login information. 
  7. You will receive email notification of your registration and payment.

By Mail

Please print out this registration form, complete it, and send it with a check made out to Duke University to:

Registration - Youth Programs
Duke Continuing Studies
Bishop's House Room 201
Box 90700
Durham, NC 27708-0700

Policies

The full payment is due at time of registration.  You can also pay a $300 non-refundable deposit and the balance by May 16, 2016.  If an account has an outstanding balance after May 16th, the registration will be cancelled and the non-refundable deposit is forfeited. Registration after May 16th requires full payment at the time of registration, which includes a $300 non-refundable deposit.

All cancellation requests must be made in writing. If the participant cancels for any reason 30 or more days prior to the first day of the program, Duke Youth Programs will refund all paid tuition less a $300 non-refundable deposit. 

Duke Youth Programs reserves the right to cancel or not hold a session or program if the minimum enrollment requirements are not met or for any reason beyond Duke Youth Programs' control. If the minimum enrollment requirements are not met, registrants will be notified one month in advance and receive a full refund of the deposit and paid tuition. For reasons beyond Duke Youth Programs' control, refund decisions will be made based on recommendations from Duke University. 

Participants who wish to change their registration from one session or program to another may do so only if space is available in the desired program. The initial non-refundable deposit will be transferred, but participants will incur an additional transfer processing fee of $50. We will not be able to make any transfers between sessions or programs if there are less than two weeks remaining before the beginning of desired camp.

Attachments

Registered participants will receive an email from Duke Youth Programs with attachments to print and complete. Please return these required forms as soon as possible or by May 3, 2016.

Additional Services (Extended Stay Option and Shuttle Services)

Extended Stay between Sessions I & II:

Duke Youth Programs will offer an Extended Stay Option for campers who would like to attend Sessions II and III and remain on campus between the two sessions. The program will provide on campus housing, meals and entertainment. The cost is $600 of which $100 is nonrefundable. The full cost is due at the time of registration. Click on the link below to add the YP - Extended Stay Option to your cart and checkout using your Youth Participant profile.

Extended Stay campers will check out of their dorms on Friday, July 22 by 12:00 pm. Campers will sign into the Extended Stay Program in (108) Randolph. (subject to change) At check in campers will meet their weekend counselors, receive their new room assignments, keys and the schedule for the weekend.

On Sunday, July 24, campers will sign out from the Extended Stay Program by 12:00 pm.  Campers will be able to sign into the Session III camps at 1:00 pm.

Shuttle Services

On arrival and departure days, Duke Youth Programs provides shuttle services to and from RDU airport. The cost is $35 to or from camp one way and $70 to and from camp both ways. An invoice for these services will be included in the transportation confirmation letter that will be sent to you before camp begins. These charges are due before the start of the session in which your child is enrolled.

Special Needs

Individuals with disabilities or other special needs who anticipate needing reasonable accommodations should contact the Director of Youth Programs at (919) 684-2827 or youth@duke.edu at the time of registration. 

Written requests for consideration for reasonable accommodation and appropriate paperwork must be received 30 days in advance of the program start date. Each request for reasonable accommodation is reviewed on a case by case basis by the Student Disability Access Office (SDAO)

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Frequently Asked Questions

Where do I live?
Who supervises me? 
Who are the instructors?
What if I arrive at the residential dorm outside the designated check-in times?
What if I am flying as an unaccompanied minor?
What if I do not have room to pack my bed linens?
What if someone wants to visit me?
What if my parents need to contact me?
What if I want to bring a laptop?
What if my parents want to send me money?
What if I need medical attention?
What if I do not have health insurance?
What if I need to cancel?
What if I need financial assistance?
What if someone wants to send me something in the mail?
What will I eat?
What if I lose my meal card?
What if I am unable to attend class?
What if I am having difficulty retrieving my medical records?
What if my travel arrangements change?
Is transportation to and from the airport or train depot provided?
What happens on the weekend?
What if I need directions?

Where do I live?
Participants in the Young Writers' Camp live in Blackwell Residence Hall on East Campus. All other camp participants are housed in Randolph Residence Hall on East Campus.

Who supervises me?
Our Residential Staff is made up of undergraduate and graduate students. The Residential Coordinator(s) is usually a graduate student with experience in counseling and/or residential life. They supervise the undergraduate counseling staff. Each counselor has a living group of 10-12 students. These staff members are on or near campus 24 hours a day and supervise the students in the evening. The program administrator and the program counselors are on call 24 hours a day.

Who are the instructors?
The instructional staff is comprised of professional educators, talented artists, and published writers. They are committed to inspiring and challenging their students.

What if I arrive at the residential dorm outside the designated check-in times?
If your travel arrangements result in you arriving before or after the designated check-in time (Sunday between the hours of 2pm and 4pm), please call the Duke Youth Programs office at 919-684-2827 as soon as possible.

Because residential staff is not required to be present until the start of registration, there is no guarantee that you will have access to the dorm if you arrive before the designated check-in time. As an alternative to waiting for the staff to arrive, consider driving to the local store to get last minute supplies or take a tour of Duke's West Campus.

If you arrive after the designated check-in time, call the Duke Youth Programs office at 919-684-2827 and provide an estimated time of arrival. The office will then contact the residential staff and put them on notice.

What if I am flying as an unaccompanied minor?
Please contact the Duke Youth Programs office at 919-684-2827 or email youth@duke.edu so we can document your child as an unaccompanied minor. Airlines require the name, address and telephone number of the person(s)who will meet the student who is traveling as an unaccompanied minor. We cannot provide that information to you at this time. A staff member of the Youth Programs will contact you 2 or 3 days before the departure date to notify you of the name(s) of the staff members (wearing Duke Youth Program staff T-shirts) who will meet your child at the arrival gate.

What if I do not have room to pack his or her bed linens?
Bed linens can be mailed to our office prior to the start of camp. Participants can also purchase linens at the local store.

What if someone wants to visit me?
Any leave of absence must be arranged in advance with the camper's residential counselor. Residential counselors can be contacted by calling the residential office (this number will be available at check-in). Campers must be picked up at and returned to the residence hall at the pre-arranged times.

Since our schedule is filled with recreational and instructional activities, we discourage long periods of time away from the program. These informal interaction times serve an important role in building community among peers and counselors.

What if my parents need to contact me?
Each residence hall will have an office where parents may call and leave messages for campers during the camp session. This phone number will be available at the program check-in. The residence hall office phone will have an answering machine if no one is present in the office to take the call. Messages will be checked regularly throughout the day. In the case of an emergency, an emergency pager number will be provided on the residential office answering machine. You may also call the main Youth Programs office at 919-684-2827, Monday-Friday 8:30am-5:00pm.

What if I want to bring a laptop?
Though not a requirement, participants in the program can bring a laptop. However, the camp will not be responsible for loss or damage to the computer and equipment.

What if my parents want to send me money?
Parents should contact the residential office and leave a message with the residential director to discuss money-wiring options.

What if I need medical attention?
Parents will be called for advice and recommendations if the problem does not require immediate medical attention. If the problem is serious, the staff member will arrange for medical treatment at the Duke Student Clinic, Duke Hospital, or other nearby medical facility. When possible, staff members will contact parent(s)/guardian(s) before seeking treatment.

You will receive an email from Youth Programs with information about the Health Form, which will need to be completed and returned to the Duke Youth Programs office before the beginning of camp. It is imperative that all parts of the form are thoroughly and legibly completed. Youth Programs staff will refer to this form for contact information in the event of a medical emergency. Medical personnel will refer to this form whenever medical treatment is necessary; this form is the only guide a health care provider will have in case of an emergency.

What if I do not have health insurance?
Duke University requires all Youth Programs' participants to have health insurance. If you do not have health insurance you may purchase temporary health insurance through a local insurance agency. Please feel free to contact us for suggestions.

What if I need to cancel?
All cancellation requests must be made in writing by sending a fax to 919-681-8235 or emailing us at youth@duke.edu. If the participant cancels for any reason 30 or more days prior to the first day of the program, Duke Youth Programs will refund all paid tuition less the $300 non-refundable deposit.

What if I need financial assistance?
Duke Youth Programs sponsors a limited number of need-based partial scholarships. Please download the Financial Assistance Application or call the Youth Programs Office to request an application at 919-684-2827 or email youth@duke.edu. Completed applications, along with all requested supplemental documents, must be received by February 16, 2015. Incomplete packets will not be considered. Applicants will be notified about award decisions by March 16, 2015.

NOTE: Duke Employees, if you are awarded financial aid then you will not be eligible to receive the Duke employee discount.

What if someone wants to send me something in the mail?
Mail should be sent to participants in care of our administrative office in the Bishop's House. The mailing address is:

Program Name
Camper's Name
Duke Continuing Studies
Bishop's House Room 205
Box 90700
Durham, NC 27708-0700

Please understand that mail delivery to participants will take at least 2 extra days, as the mail must travel from the US Postal Service to the Duke Postal Service to the Duke Youth Programs office and then to the participant. Also, Duke mail does not deliver on Saturdays.

What will I eat?
All program participants eat in the campus dining halls. Campers in all programs except Duke ACTION, Duke Biosciences and Engineering Camp, Duke IMAGINE and Duke Math will have all meals in the East Campus Marketplace. Residential and Extended Day participants of Duke ACTION, Duke Biosciences and Engineering, and Duke IMAGINE will eat breakfast and dinner in the East Campus Marketplace and lunch on West Campus. Duke Computer Camp participants will eat lunch on West campus.  Participants can choose from a variety of vegetarian and meat entrees, vegetables, breads, sandwiches, salad bar, drinks and desserts. Lunch for all campers (residential, extended and day campers) is included in tuition.

What if I lose my meal card?
If either the card or the key is lost or misplaced, the participant should notify his/her counselor immediately so a replacement may be issued and the lost card key deactivated to ensure the safety of residents. Participants are responsible for the replacement cost of each lost or damaged card key ($15) or room key ($100).

What if I am unable to attend class?
If your child will be absent for the day, please notify the Duke Youth Programs Office so we can inform his/her instructor.

What if I am having difficulty retrieving my medical records?
Please contact the Duke Youth Programs office for assistance in getting medical records.

What if my travel arrangements have changed?
Please contact the Duke Youth Programs office at 919-684-2827 as soon as possible regarding any travel changes.

Is transportation to and from the airport or train depot provided?
Duke Youth Programs provides shuttle services to and from RDU to campus and train depot stations. For airline travelers, the cost is $35 for one way and $70 for both ways.

What happens on the weekend?
Residential campers will have the opportunity to participate in a variety of activities that are organized by the residential counseling staff.

What if I need directions?
Click on the links below, click on the diections button on the upper left corner, and enter the address from which you're traveling.

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