Loading...

Course Description

As Shakespearean scholar David Bevington observes, Macbeth's "awareness of and sensitivity to moral issues, together with his conscious choice of evil, produce an unnerving account of human failure, all the more distressing because Macbeth is so representatively human." The question then becomes what accounts for Macbeth's "choice of evil"? How does a good man lose his moral compass? What are the internal and external forces that play upon him? As interested as Shakespeare is in motivation, his greater concern in this tragedy is the far-reaching impact of evil actions, not only on victims, but on the perpetrator himself. As we engage in a close examination of the script, we will test Bevington's notion of Macbeth as "representatively human." Through a variety of activities and in-depth discussions, we will examine key soliloquies, dialogues, and scenes. In addition to reviewing critical scholarship on the tragedy and viewing clips of performances, we will explore ways in which it speaks to us on a personal level. Lecture (plus Questions); Facilitated Discussion; Viewing Videos
Loading...
Thank you for your interest in this course. Unfortunately, the course you have selected is currently not open for enrollment. Please complete a Course Inquiry so that we may promptly notify you when enrollment opens.